Stories of the city

Marco Luccio

What do the cities we live in say about our lives? Marco Luccio (Bachelor of Fine Art with Honours, 1992) has been exploring this question throughout his career as an award-winning artist. See the story behind his work and what leadership in art means to him.

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The Cranes and State Library from QVB Site  

For The Cranes and State Library from QVB Site (drypoint on Velin Arches, 2003) I sat on a building opposite the State Library in Melbourne and scratched the cranes as they hovered around the beautiful dome of this classical structure. I was interested in the contrast between the roundness of the dome and the lines of the cranes. The striking sounds of the cranes moving about were all audible as I positioned myself close to the action.

Leadership in the arts is doing what you need and want to do, regardless of what is the norm. Knowing I'm following the path I have always wanted to be on keeps me going, no matter what.

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The Cranes and State Library from QVB Site  

For The Cranes and State Library from QVB Site (drypoint on Velin Arches, 2003) I sat on a building opposite the State Library in Melbourne and scratched the cranes as they hovered around the beautiful dome of this classical structure. I was interested in the contrast between the roundness of the dome and the lines of the cranes. The striking sounds of the cranes moving about were all audible as I positioned myself close to the action.

Leadership in the arts is doing what you need and want to do, regardless of what is the norm. Knowing I'm following the path I have always wanted to be on keeps me going, no matter what.

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Bridge from Below
Bridge from Below  

Cities to me are proof of life expressed in monuments. They are intense hubs of creativity and energy. The Sydney Harbour Bridge is part of that too – and in Bridge from Below (drypoint, 2005) I felt I had to capture the drive and ambition of a city that accepted no limits.

My main medium over the years has been drypoint [a printmaking technique using etching on copper plates]. Civilisation is the one theme that runs through most of my work. It’s expressed through the cities we build, the artefacts and monuments we leave behind.
For me, being an artist is a way of living. I would like to think I am able to share my life experience and further understand myself and the world through my art.

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The Flatiron
The Flatiron  

The Flatiron (Drypoint on Velin Arches, 2008) is a building I had imagined drawing for a long time before arriving in New York. The unusual shape of the building was the first point of attraction for me. The color of the stonework gave the building a delicate appearance and I found the contrast of this beautiful old building against the modern posters on the walls of nearby facades interesting.

I scratched initially on site on the corner of Fifth Avenue and Broadway. More people than I have ever experienced in any other city crowded around, which I found very distracting and unnerving, but knew I would be rewarded with something I could not achieve in any other way.

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The Pinnacles
The Pinnacles  

The Pinnacles (Drypoint, 2013) is inspired by the monumental and awesome beauty of the rugged coastline at Phillip Island. I was immediately struck by the architectural qualities of the massive molten formations of the alien landscape.

To create this drypoint, I dragged the 80 x 120cm copper sheet to location over sand, rock and rubble, scratching and embedding background marks of the journey along the way. Over a 12 month period I worked amongst the chainsaw-like noise of the crashing waves. I worked in wind, rain and freezing cold as well as the hottest of summer days.

I like to think that my life’s work becomes something universal that can give some cause for reflection to those who view it – if I'm lucky.

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Marco Luccio
Marco Luccio  

I make my work because it keeps me feeling human. The fact people buy and collect my work and I can live mainly from my art is a bonus. Being an artist is the most exciting life I could imagine. To younger artists, I say pursue it with all your soul, but be gentle on yourself.
Learn that you are not your art. Don't attach your identity to your art no matter how personal it is. You can be a success however you define it for yourself. You don't have to change who you are, the work you want to make, or sell your soul to be successful. Work from empowerment not fear, know there is enough for everyone and help others achieve their goals. Surround yourself with positive people.
Mentoring in art plays a huge role giving people courage to build trust in themselves. It’s wonderful to see people who have attended my workshops who had been told to give up on their art, now exhibiting, selling work, being artists.

Previous Artwork
Next Artwork
Previous Artwork
Next Artwork

The Cranes and State Library...

Bridge from Below

Bridge from Below

The Flatiron

The Flatiron

The Pinnacles

The Pinnacles

Marco Luccio

Marco Luccio